Defining Diesel and petrol engines

A diesel engine can be up to 40% more efficient than a spark-ignited petrol engine with the same power output, ceteris paribus, particularly with new ‘low’ compression diesels.

The calorific value of diesel fuel is roughly 45.5 MJ/kg (megajoules per kilogram), slightly lower than petrol which is 45.8 MJ/kg.  Diesel fuel is denser than petrol and contains about 15% more energy by volume (roughly 36.9 MJ/litre compared to 33.7 MJ/litre). Accounting for the difference in energy density, the overall efficiency of the diesel engine is still some 20% greater than the petrol engine, despite the diesel engine also being heavier.

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EN 590:2009—FAME content of 7% as regulated by Directive 2009/30/EC. This directive also adopts mandatory biofuel requirements for refiners and introduces a 10 ppm S limit in nonroad fuels effective 2011.  The EN 590:1993 included a sulfur limit of 0.2% (wt.), which became effective from October 1994

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Two sets of standards establish the specifications for biodiesel fuels in the European Union:

  1. EN 14214 includes specifications for fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) fuel for diesel engines. B100 that meets this standard could be used unblended in a diesel engine (if the engine has been adapted to operate on B100) or blended with petroleum diesel fuel.
  2. EN 590, the European diesel fuel specification, is also applicable to biodiesel blends up to 7% of FAME.

Automotive Gasoline Supplier EN590 Europe

World Oil TradersTrusted fuel suppliers of petrochemical products and derivatives:

  • M100/Fuel Oil GOST 10585-75/99/2013
  • D6 Virgin Diesel Bunker Fuel
  • D2 Diesel Fuel/EN 590 GOST R 52368-2005
  • D2 Gasoil L0.2/62 GOST 305-82
  • Fuel Oil 380 CST
  • Jet Fuel (JP54)/Aviation Kerosene
  • #95 Octane
  • Crude Oil (Heavy & Light)
  • Russian Export Blend Crude Oil R.E.B.C.O. GOST 51858-2002
  • Jet A1
  • LNG
  • LPG